The greatest of these is love

When I tell people my mum has dementia they invariably say,

“Does she still know who you are?”

She does when I hug her and hold her close and tell her I love her. Her brain may not remember my name but her body can feel that she loves me. I know it.

The gift of dementia is that I have had four years to say goodbye to my beautiful mama. Four years to create new memories and remember some of her old ones. To hear the same stories again and again so the family history is firmly locked in my brain until it is my turn to fade away.

Four years to hold her hands and tell her that she is still a devoted mother. Four years of visits to calm the madness rush of single mother life in my head while I put her hand in mine. Four years of quiet afternoons to sit with her in silence while I rub hand cream into her old dry hands. Four years of cups of tea and bickies. Four years of running away from the nursing home in tears with a broken heart while remembering all the small ways she loved me. Four years to be reminded how she cared for our dogs, yelled at me over homework, washed our clothes, fed us endless dinners and sang in the kitchen.

Mumma loved her career before kids but she loved us more. Her four kids and seven grandchildren were her life’s work. Having our family was the greatest joy of her life.

Four years of stories shared with whoever else came to visit. Four years being able to take in her I am your mother and I’m not going anywhere fierceness, and four years to realise that I don’t care any more about our differences, fights over my clothing and hairdos and politics, I feel grateful that she cared enough to argue with me.

Four years to look at old photos and realise what she built for us. Four years to be reminded that she introduced me to Stevie Wonder and Billie Holiday and Ella Fitzgerald and taught me how to sing.

My mum interviewed Squizzy Taylor and met Frank Sinatra and talked to colourful Sydney racing identities and was invited to all the best parties when she wrote the social pages. And still my dad, my brothers and sister and I and our kids were the best part of her life. Not all kids get to have a mumma like mine.

Some families have their loved ones snatched away in an instant, but I’ve had time to be with her and hug her tight and tell her how much she means to me.

In the past year she has wet her pants and worn her clothes backwards and spilt dinners and tea all over herself. She has let her hair go and not worried about matching her top with her skirt. All the petty little problems of life have slipped away and all that remains is that my mum’s face lights up when my kids and I walk in the room. That is love.

I know my dad is coming to get her soon, they will get to be together again and I have to remember that on the days that I’m missing her so much that I can’t breathe.

My mum was from a family of godbotherers, devout Anglicans who often quoted the bible. This is the only verse I remember from years of reluctant Sunday school attendance (Corinthians)

And now these three remain: faith, hope and love. But the greatest of these is love.


Love and Let Go

Jenny McGregor makes me cry. She sings like an angel, has perfect skin and a gorgeous husband. Her children are so cute it is revolting. Jen’s beautiful smile could fool anyone into thinking that life has been easy for her. But when Jen’s adorable first-born son died suddenly at the age of 18 months she was broken. I still can’t believe that she could go through that kind of loss, and now she is so strong she can walk into children’s hospitals every week to cheer up sick and dying kids.

 

Jen and her husband have been through the kind of spiritual growth no one wants to experience in their lifetime. Music helped with Jenny’s healing, but she found that no one was writing songs that dealt with the death of a child in a profound way. 

My beautiful colleague has been through every parent’s worst nightmare and now wants to help other grieving families. Jen is going to record an album of songs for bereaved parents but she needs money to employ professional musicians. Love and Let Go will be an album of great music with the proceeds going to the charity Red Nose, who provide free counselling for parents who have lost a child.

 

Jenny McGregor is very close to her fundraising target, but we need to help her get over the line. This woman is a shining star. Please donate if you can. Even $10 will help Jen realise her dream of supporting families who are suffering.
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/940372533/love-and-let-go-an-album-for-bereaved-parent


 


May you find comfort

Yesterday another precious soul left us, way too young, surrounded by the love of his beautiful sisters and parents. It was an honour to watch his courage and strength. His mama and papa inspire me to be a better parent. RIP sweet boy, you are so loved


Canberra Book launch for the Sound of Silence

If you are in Canberra this Saturday please come to the book launch for The Sound of Silence, a book filled with sad, beautiful and uplifting heartfelt stories.

 

The Sound of Silence

Journeys Through Miscarriage


The Sound of Silence Book

Miscarriage is not spoken about, parents often suffer in silence. Until I suffered two miscarriages I had no idea how many women I knew had endured the sadness of losing a baby as well. I wrote a story for this book which is available to buy now. If you have suffered or love someone who has suffered pregnancy loss this book may provide comfort.

Buy online at http://www.mostlyformothers.com/miscarriage.html or at your favourite bookstore.

Miscarriage stories

The Sound of Silence


The Sound of Silence

I have written a story called Sorrow Comes Unsent For, which is included in an anthology called The Sound of Silence – Journeys Through Miscarriage. When I was pregnant I looked forward and saw the new life that was coming. Then I miscarried and that life was gone, but there was no funeral or mourning period observed. I was angry at my body for failing me, sad when my due date arrived and I had nothing to show for it. I wanted to share the story of one of my miscarriages so that other women who have experienced the trauma realise they are not alone.

All the authors have poured their hearts out in the book, the stories are beautiful and moving. If you know someone who has lost a child through miscarriage this book may be a nice gift to show that you are thinking of them.

The Sound of Silence book is published on October 1.